Ponderance

(May 2003 - March 2007.) Tama's thoughts on the blogosphere, podcasting, popular culture, digital media and citizen journalism posted from a laptop computer somewhere in Perth's isolated, miniature, urban jungle ...

Tracking the MySpace Generation

Tuesday, August 29, 2006
The LA Times recently ran a fabulously detailed series called "Tracking the MySpace Generation" which is based on results of a wide-ranging survey of teenagers and young adults in California. Given recent debates and myths about social networking, the demise of cinema (or, at least, the multiplex), the rise of mobile content and the legalities and practicalities of digital media, I think this series of reports has a lot of interesting information. A few things which stood out for me ...

About half of young adults and 4 in 10 teenagers said they were uninterested in watching television shows or movies on computers, cellphones or hand-held devices such as video iPods. [Source]

Which leaves over 50% of teenagers who are happy watching portable context on teeny-weeny screens! That's a huge potential audience/market.

Despite the widespread belief that a sizable number of young people get their news from satirical programs such as Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show,” just 3% of teenagers and 6% of young adults surveyed said that’s how they found out about current events. [Source]

I'd be horrified to think The Daily Show was the main source of news about current affairs, but I do wonder how many people found it assisted them in understanding politics.

Myth: Kids run rampant on the Internet, evading the supervision of their parents, who are too old to figure out what their children are up to.
Truth: Nearly 7 in 10 of 12- to 17-year-olds said their parents knew how they spent their time online. Nearly 3 out of 5 12- to 14-year-olds said their parents restricted what they could download. About a third of boys and girls ages 12 to 14 are not allowed to go on social networking sites such as MySpace.com. Only 19% of boys and 13% of girls reported having no parental restrictions on computer use. [Source]

Given my last post about MySpace, DOPA and Australia, I was extremely heartened that so many of the iGeneration (or Net Generation, or MySpace Genration or whatever overdetermined generational tag you prefer) are being schooled about social networking by their parents. :)

Also fascinating was this chart comparing of what young Americans find offensive, broken down via gender and age (uses Flash).

[Via Henry Jenkins]

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