Ponderance

(May 2003 - March 2007.) Tama's thoughts on the blogosphere, podcasting, popular culture, digital media and citizen journalism posted from a laptop computer somewhere in Perth's isolated, miniature, urban jungle ...

Artificial Mourning, Remembrance and Moving On ...

Friday, September 17, 2004
In a truly fascinating development in the digital spaces of Second Life, gamers have established virtual worlds of artificial mourning reflecting on the aftermath of September 11th:

[Click to enlarge.]
The New World Notes by Wagner James Au has details here and here of the amazing sites of mourning established in Second Life; these sites not only graphically resurrect the twin towers (in some cases), but also represent responses from across the political spectrum. I couldn't help but see similarities between these September 11th memorials and the Walled City which William Gibson describes in Idoru. Both show how the digital can be used not only to craft responses but also (in a relatively limited way at present), the lost buildings and artefacts can re-emerge in digital formations! [Via WaxyLinks]

In tangentially related news, the New York Times has greeted the release of The Sims 2 with ethusiasm and notes:
Sims 2, a much enhanced version of the life-simulation game from Maxis, is the video-game answer to reality television shows like "The Real World" and "Big Brother." Like these shows, Sims 2 allows the lives of its characters to unfold in moments of chaos and carnality. But unlike television, in which the audience is confined to the role of passive viewer, the game puts you into the action in the role of a god. And not a distant, magnanimous god, but one of those petty Roman gods who amuse themselves by toying with people.
Ah, the gameplayer as petty, pertty God ... sounds like loving memories of Populous could be applied to these new Sims! And for the truly bizzare, check out the NYTimes report on the new game based on John Kerry's Vietnam War experience!

0 Comments:

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home